Rape, sexual harassment, and the male culture

Protesters in Brazil calling for justice for the 16-year-old rape victim. (Source: screenshot from ¬¬¬¬dailymail.co.uk)
Protesters in Brazil calling for justice for the 16-year-old rape victim. (Source: screenshot from dailymail.co.uk)

Apparently if you are a promising athlete, you can get away with sexually assaulting an unconscious woman for a jail time of only six months and that three counts of felony can be mitigated because prison time might be detrimental for a promising sports career.

This incident, which people over the internet called as the ‘Stanford rape’ caused an outrage this week when the Judge who presided over the case ruled that the accused, Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner guilty but sentenced him to what people believe is an unjust and unfair sentence.

The 23-year-old victim remained anonymous in order to represent all the women and rape victims.

“It is the saddest type of confusion to be told I was assaulted and nearly raped, blatantly out in the open, but we don’t know if it counts as assault yet. I had to fight for an entire year to make it clear that there was something wrong with this situation,” she said in a statement.

That is only one example of how men, even the investigators and police seem to look for a fault in a woman instead of condemning the immoral action of a man.

Another rape case in Brazil sparked a massive protest, when a 16-year-old girl was allegedly raped by more than 30 men.

“It’s the stigma that hurts me the most. It is as if people are saying ‘it’s her fault. She was using scanty clothes.’ I want people to know that it is not the woman’s fault. You can’t blame a robbery victim, for being robbed,” the victim said to a Brazilian newspaper.

What is exasperating about the rape culture is that it has always been there, it was called a culture because it has become a part of the way of life of some people. And culture, being longstanding is something that is very difficult to destroy no matter how awful it is.

The irony of today’s generation is evident. While at one point, people are quick to point out what is wrong with media representation of women, which is a good thing, in the same breath, the same people can be quick to pass judgment to others with very little basis such as the social media and clothing.

However, with the same medium, hope is not all lost. With the easy spreading of information today, people are being educated that what their fathers, the people around them or the media told them are not really necessarily right. There is value in respect nowadays, with women standing up and pointing out that, ‘Hey! I am a person; you cannot objectify my body or my intelligence’. (Kathleen Vicho)

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