DIWATA-1 captures first set of images in initial testing phase

Kudos to our Filipno engineers for their world-class intellect and perseverance!

DIWATA-1, the first-ever Philippine micro-satellite was launched off into the orbit from the Japanese Experiment Module ‘Kibo’ on the International Space Station on April 27.

The micro-satellite was built by nine Filipino engineers from the University of the Philippines and the Department of Science and Technology’s Advance Science and Technology Institute.

DIWATA-1 is deployed 400 kilometers from the Earth’s surface.

DIWATA-1 being released from ISS, taken by Tim Peake, Astronaut. (Photo by: JAXA/NASA)
DIWATA-1 being released from ISS, taken by Tim Peake, Astronaut. (Photo by: JAXA/NASA)

Photos are up! (or down since you know, it’s from up there)

DIWATA-1 has four highly specialized on-board cameras for Earth observations, and multiple test images have been successfully taken and downloaded.

An image of the Earth taken by the fish-eye monochrome wide-field camera (WFC) on DIWATA-1 captured at 02:55UT (11:55JST) on May 6, 2016.]
An image of the Earth taken by the fish-eye monochrome wide-field camera (WFC) on DIWATA-1 captured at 02:55UT (11:55JST) on May 6, 2016.]

 

An image of the province of Isabela in the island of Luzon, the Republic of Philippines, taken by the medium field-of-view color camera (MFC), captured at 9:15 (PHT) on May 17, 2016.
An image of the province of Isabela in the island of Luzon, taken by the medium field-of-view color camera (MFC), captured at 9:15 (PHT) on May 17, 2016.

The test image captures a portion of the coastal seaboard of Isabela province, which includes parts of the municipalities of Maconacon, Divilacan and Palanan.

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For this picture, the satellite was moving over the Luzon Island and looked down at the target area vertically, with the pointing control toward the center of the Earth.

The images that the micro-satellite aims to take will be used for imaging of our land and water resources and for studying changes in weather pattern, agricultural productivity and disaster response and mitigation.

The micro-satellite was developed by Tohoku University, Hokkaido University, the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) of the Republic of the Philippines and the University of the Philippines Diliman under the DOST-funded research program, “Development of the Philippine Scientific Earth Observation Microsatellite (PHL-MICROSAT)”.

DIWATA-1 is set to enter normal operation phase by August 2016, after subjecting to extensive testing and characterization. (Kathleen Vicho)

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